Category Archives: Blog

All Offices Are Open for Dental Services

Dear Patients:

We hope this letter finds you and your family in good health. Our community has been through a lot over the last few months, and all of us are looking forward to resuming our normal habits and routines. While many things have changed, one thing has remained the same: our commitment to your safety.

Infection control has always been a top priority for our practice and you may have seen this during your visits to our office. Our infection control processes are made so that when you receive care, it’s both safe and comfortable. We want to tell you about the infection control procedures we follow in our practice to keep patients and staff safe.

Our office follows infection control recommendations made by the American Dental Association (ADA), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). We follow the activities of these agencies so that we are up-to-date on any new rulings or guidance that may be issued.

You may see some changes when it is time for your next appointment. We made these changes to help protect our patients and staff. For example:

  • Our office will communicate with you beforehand to ask some screening questions. You’ll be asked those same questions again when you are in the office.
  • We have hand sanitizer that we will ask you to use when you enter the office. You will also find some in the reception area and other places in the office for you to use as needed.
  • You may see that our waiting room will no longer offer magazines, children’s toys and so forth, since those items are difficult to clean and disinfect.
  • Appointments will be managed to allow for social distancing between patients. That might mean that you’re offered fewer options for scheduling your appointment.
  • We will do our best to allow greater time between patients to reduce waiting times for you, as well as to reduce the number of patients in the reception area at any one time.

We look forward to seeing you again and are happy to answer any questions you may have about the steps we take to keep you, and every patient, safe in our practice. To make an appointment, please call your office and they will gladly assist you.  

Thank you for being our patient. We value your trust and loyalty and look forward to welcoming back our patients, neighbors and friends.

Sincerely,

Cosmetic and Dental Implant Center

All Offices Closed due to COVID-19 (Coronavirus)

Due to the concerns about COVID-19 (Coronavirus), all of our offices are currently closed until the shelter-at-home order is lifted. We are planning to re-open all locations as soon as we are allowed to. During this period, we are still able to see current and new patients for any emergencies by appointment only.

If you have a dental emergency, please contact the doctors at the following phone numbers based on the office location you are going to.

Huntington Beach and Placentia – Dr. Trinh Nguyen – (714) 725-2342

Brea and Cypress – Dr. Tuan Nguyen – (714) 360-4328

POSTPONED – 2020 Patient Appreciation Picnic

Dear Patients,

Due to the recent events concerning the Coronavirus (COVID-19), we are unfortunately postponing our annual Patient Appreciation Picnic scheduled for Sun, April 5th, out of an abundance of caution.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused. We are sad but we believe this is the best decision for our patients and community at this time.

We are still looking forward to having a Patient Appreciation Picnic this summer, we will announce a new date when the current situation has resolved.

We wish you all well,

Cosmetic and Dental Implant Center / Cypress Smiles Dentistry

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Prevention

Dear Patients,

As concerns for the coronavirus grows, we want you to know that we are taking this matter seriously.  We abide by all CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and ADA (American Dental Association) guidelines for sterilization. Patient operatories (rooms) will continue to be disinfected between every patient as we have always done.  In addition, we are disinfecting the patient lobby and restrooms at least every 2 hrs.  High patient contact surfaces like pens, stylus, iPads and remotes controls will be disinfect after each use.  To combat misinformation, below are basic recommendations from the CDC.

There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease (COVID-19).
The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.

The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
  • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

Older adults and people who have severe underlying chronic medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19 illness. Please consult with your health care provider about additional steps you may be able to take to protect yourself.

Take steps to protect yourself

Illustration: washing hands with soap and water

Clean your hands often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.

If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.

  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
Illustration: Woman quarantined to her home

Avoid close contact

Take steps to protect others

man in bed

Stay home if you’re sick

woman covering their mouth when coughing

Cover coughs and sneezes

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
man wearing a mask

Wear a facemask if you are sick

  • If you are sick:  You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then you should do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes, and people who are caring for you should wear a facemask if they enter your room. Learn what to do if you are sick.
  • If you are NOT sick: You do not need to wear a facemask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a facemask). Facemasks may be in short supply and they should be saved for caregivers.
cleaning a counter

Clean and disinfect

  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.

To disinfect:
Most common EPA-registered household disinfectants will work. Use disinfectants appropriate for the surface.

Options include:

  • Diluting your household bleach.
    To make a bleach solution, mix:
    • 5 tablespoons (1/3rd cup) bleach per gallon of water
      OR
    • 4 teaspoons bleach per quart of water

Follow manufacturer’s instructions for application and proper ventilation. Check to ensure the product is not past its expiration date. Never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser. Unexpired household bleach will be effective against coronaviruses when properly diluted.

  • Alcohol solutions.
    Ensure solution has at least 70% alcohol.
  • Other common EPA-registered household disinfectants.
    Products with EPA-approved emerging viral pathogens pdf icon[7 pages]external icon claims are expected to be effective against COVID-19 based on data for harder to kill viruses. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products (e.g., concentration, application method and contact time, etc.).

CDIC: What Should You Put in an Earthquake Kit for Oral Care?

emergencykitHollywood has a long fascination with disaster, and perhaps the biggest disaster movies of them all are the ever-popular earthquake movies! In fact, another one is coming out soon. They are fun to watch, but they also may get you to thinking about what you would do if there was an earthquake in your area.

There isn’t too much you can do during an earthquake, except for gathering your family and pets and trying to stay safe. But there is one thing you can (and should) do ahead of time. You can prepare an emergency kit, in case the earthquake results in power and water outages and other problems.

When you prepare your emergency kit, you want to make sure you have included items that will ensure your safety, comfort and health. So when you’re getting that emergency kit ready, don’t forget to include items in there for oral care! Here is a list of items to put into your emergency kit, compliments of Dr. Trinh Nguyen and the staff of the Cosmetic and Dental Implant Center!

Your Emergency Kit

What should you put in an earthquake kit for oral care? You might argue that some of these items you already have around the house, so why should you put them in the kit? Keep in mind that you never know what will be going on after an event, such as an earthquake.

  1. Toothpaste, of course. But don’t just assume you can pack one tube for the whole family. For instance, your toddler would probably do best with a toothpaste made for kids.

  2. Toothbrushes for every member of the family

  3. Floss

  4. Travel-sized mouthwash

  5. Special items for oral care — does someone in the family wear dentures? Don’t forget denture cleaner. Does someone wear braces? Don’t forget flossers or other tools that brace-wearers need to keep their teeth clean.

  6. Does your pet have oral health problems? Don’t forget to pack up tools for cleaning their teeth too.

  7. Gum with xylitol, which helps to keep teeth clean. Gum is a quick way to freshen your breath. Make sure you get sugar-free gum, though.

  8. Bottled water. This is important to include in any emergency kit. You’ll want to make sure you have clean water when it’s time to brush. It’s also good to rinse after eating when you can’t get to brushing right away.

  9. Healthy snacks. Again, these are important for emergencies for many reasons. Make sure you pack snacks that aren’t sugary. Snacks that are good for teeth that will keep well for a long time include: peanuts, almonds and cashews (which contain vitamins and minerals that keep teeth and gums healthy); cans of beans, which contain mouth-healthy vitamins and minerals; and raisins.

It is worth the time and effort to put together an emergency kit before you ever need it. It is easy to do. Once you put it together, all you have to do is periodically check it to make sure items haven’t gone bad and need to be replaced.

We should all be prepared for the worst while hoping for the best. And this could describe visiting your dentist, too! Make sure you visit Dr. Trinh Nguyen and the staff of the Cosmetic and Dental Implant Center twice a year for your regular check-ups! Call the center today at (714)-702-1328.

Which Is Worse for Teeth — Baseball or Golf?

Do you love baseball? Or is golf more your thing? If you are worried about the safety of your teeth, here are some reasons why you should choose golf over baseball!

Baseball

The first thing that may come to mind when you think of baseball is a man standing on the pitcher’s mound squinting in the sun and spitting tobacco out his mouth. Although baseball teams have started cracking down on chewing tobacco (which can cause gum disease, tooth decay, and even oral cancer) baseball still holds dangers for the teeth.

After all, if you are the hitter, the baseball is coming straight at you at speeds anywhere from 40 to 100 miles per hour (granted, you would have to be a professional player to have a ball coming at you at 100 miles per hour, but even 40 miles per hour is pretty fast if you get a ball to the face!). If you are in the outfield, you are facing a ball that has been hit and is coming at you at 60 miles an hour (or more).

And of course, baseball can sometimes turn into a contact sport, with players crashing into each other as they all try to get the ball or sliding into the base. You could even argue that baseball encourages cavities. Remember when they used to package baseball cards and sugary gum together?

Because baseball can be dangerous for teeth, if you love playing the game, you don’t want to forget your mouthguard! Mouthguards can help protect players from cuts on the lips and tongue, and even more serious problems such as broken teeth and jaw injuries. Mouthguards aren’t just for baseball, though. Basketball, hockey, soccer and football players also should wear mouth protection because you never know what might happen out there as you’re playing the game.

Golf

Golf, on the other hand, is a bit safer than baseball, just because the ball is supposed to be going the other direction and because you are supposedly not standing within your buddy’s swing radius. However, bad golf players can hit balls off the green, which could hurt you or someone near you. If you are careful, though, the danger is minimal.

The odds of golf becoming a contact sport are also not very high. Indeed, the only way golf may be a real danger to your teeth is if you use your weekly golf game as a chance to drink down lots of sugary, cavity-inducing soft drinks!

Whether you love to play baseball or some other potentially dangerous sport, you should always make a special effort to protect your teeth and mouth. But despite our best efforts, bad things do happen sometimes. If you need cosmetic dentistry or dental implants because of an unfortunate accident caused by a fast pitch, the Cosmetic and Dental Implant Center can help!

The CDIC not only offers cosmetic and implant dentistry, but we also offer other personalized and high-quality dental care, all courtesy of our compassionate and expert staff. We offer office hours to accommodate your busy schedule and payment plans so that you can get help for your teeth without emptying out your wallet.

If you have any questions about how best to take care of your teeth while playing sports, if you need help after a sports accident or if you just need a routine cleaning, give the Cosmetic and Dental Implant Center a call at (714) 702-1328!

CDIC Dental’s Annual Picnic 2015

Cosmetic and Dental Implant Center's Spring Fling Picnic!

Come and join in on the food, fun, and games.

Come and join us for our annual spring picnic filled with food, games and other activities.  Please RSVP with Tara Orta at (714)257-0330 or Brea@cdicdental.com.

Sunday, April 12th 2015 from 12:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Clark Regional Park at the “Clark Shelter”

8800 Rosecrans Avenue

Buena Park, CA 90621